<![CDATA[Flying on insulin - Blog]]>Tue, 05 Jan 2016 20:03:40 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[12 Years In The Making]]>Fri, 09 Oct 2015 02:11:16 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/12-years-in-the-makingIf you remember October 8, 2003, you may remember some of the major news headlines from that day. China announces they will have a human crew briefly orbit the Earth later that month, NBC Universal is born following the merger of Vivendi Universal and General Electric, and the United States and Vietnam agree to allow flights between the two countries since the end of the Vietnam War. The ironic thing is... I don't remember much about this day; however, I celebrate it every year. 

Twelve years ago today, I was diagnosed with Type One Diabetes. In those 12 years I've been able to do a lot, experience a lot, find my passion in life, and achieve a major goal... become an FAA Licensed Private Pilot. In those 12 years I have checked my blood sugar approximately 35,040 times, changed my infusion set 2,190 times, and have been to the endocrinologist countless times. It isn't about that though. Look, I'm not going to lie... Type One Diabetes sucks. I have to go through life knowing I can't be an airline pilot without going through major red tape and then still risk having a medical certificate jerked from me at anytime. Somedays I don't want to change my infusion set or fill my pump, we're all human and aren't perfect. My fingers have spots on them from checking my blood sugar so many times. Inevitably, my lifespan has been shortened some fro T1D, it is what it is and it could ALWAYS be worse. 

In June of 2007 my mom and I went to St. Louis, MO for a JDRF conference. Keep in mind if I wasn't diagnosed with T1D, I never would have gone. On the way home, some random things happened and we were delayed in the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport for 9 hours. I don't know exactly what happened; however, I was hooked. I knew I wanted to be an airline pilot. Looking back on it all I have more or less liked aviation my entire life. I used to always sit in the window seat and ask the pilots for plastic wings. One time, (pre 9/11) I vaguely remember going into the flightdeck of what I believe was a Boeing 757 and watching it slice through the clouds, it was mesmerizing. In 2004 at a Children With Diabetes Conference, Michael Hunter (an air show pilot with T1D), asked me what I wanted to do when I was older. I responded: I want to do what you do. 

Diabetes for me isn't just about the numbers. It's about what can come from diabetes if you look beyond the numbers and the general inconvenience diabetes is. At 18 I can say I've traveled a lot, flown a lot, became an Eagle Scout, became a Private Pilot, and met a ton of awesome people. The people have made it the most enjoyable for me. Diabetes for me has been one giant instance of serendipity mixed with a lot of paying it forward from some incredible people. 

The past twelve years have been an adventure that I'm not sure I would change for anything. Two things are for certain, T1D never will stop me. Secondly, someday I will be Pilot in Command of an airliner. Today to celebrate 12 years of living wit T1D, I went flying as Pilot in Command of a Cessna 172. I love taking off not only for the fact of breaking the bonds of Earth, but for proving people wrong. Diabetics aren't a danger to aviation at all. I was told I'd never be a pilot and now look, I am one.  Look the bottom line is, diabetes is what you make out of it. If you want to let it consume your life and make you miserable, then let it. If you want to use it to make you push harder and never take no for an answer, then do that. However, whatever you do, don't give up and don't let diabetes win. AirTran Airways summed it up best in their slogan... Go. There's Nothing Stopping You. 

Until next time,

Jay
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<![CDATA[Diabetes Formation Flight 2015: Coming Soon]]>Thu, 23 Jul 2015 20:37:38 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/diabetes-formation-flight-2015-coming-soonTo a complete and total fault of my own, I get so excited about future blog posts that previous ones end up suffering content wise. I could do a single blog post to lead up to this blog post; however, I won't bore you. In July I had the privilege of attending the annual Friends for Life Conference in Orlando, FL hosted by Children with Diabetes. If you have never attended one of their conferences, I cannot recommend it enough. Everything is handled so professionally and the sessions are incredible. Ironically enough, I went to meet up with friend and fellow T1D pilot from Europe, Douglas Cairns. I ended up getting to meet many of my friends from across the T1D community which was totally awesome. 

I was thrilled to finally meet Douglas in person. If there is one person in the flying community I look up to and have a great deal of respect for, it is Douglas. At the ripe age of 25, Douglas was an instructor pilot flying jets in the United Kingdom's Royal Air Force (RAF). He was then shortly diagnosed with T1D and was told by his doctor: "You are now a diabetic and you were a pilot." Extremely harsh words for one who has dreamed of flying since boyhood. Douglas has since proved his doctor wrong by accomplishing several things in flying including a solo flight around the world in his Beechcraft Baron as well as several speed and formation records. It was a true privilege to get to meet Douglas and speak with him on our flying endeavors. 

I was elated to even be able to hear Douglas speak. He started to talk about an upcoming event in the United States, Diabetes Formation Flight 2015. Douglas looks at me and says: "Jay, you're welcome to come with us." My eyes lit up, I was just invited by one of the leading pilots with T1D to fly with him. First of all, I would like to extend my thanks to Douglas and everyone at Diabetes Formation Flight for welcoming me to the group! I'm beyond excited to be able to fly with you all and I hope that I prove to be an asset to the group. 

So, what is Diabetes Formation Flight (DFF)? DFF is a formation flight that is flown by pilots with T1D to raise awareness as to what people with T1D can do. DFF also raises awareness to help change regulations so people with T1D can someday fly commercially. This years flight will start at Council Bluffs Municipal Airport in Iowa and will end there three days later. The trip will be around 1,300NM and will stop in four states (IA,SD,NE,CO). Depending on what all aircraft are flown we will try and swap passengers around. Unfortunately, I don't own an airplane and I'm not an instrumented rated pilot so I will be flying as a passenger. However, I will have some changes to get some right seat time in Douglas's 1970 Beechcraft Baron. When we are in Boulder, CO we plan on doing some mountain flying which is a total backlist item of mine. 

I'm working on a way to document this incredible adventure so I can share it with everyone. I plan on a lot of GoPro footage and pictures. Also, social media feeds so everyone can follow our progress live. Again, my sincerest thank you to Douglas and everyone else involved in the project for allowing me to be a part of it this year. I can't even began to articulate how excited I truly am, September can't come soon enough! Stay tuned as updates will follow. 
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Our proposed route of flight for the trip
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Douglas's Baron
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<![CDATA[I've wanted to do this one for years...]]>Mon, 18 May 2015 01:23:54 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/ive-wanted-to-do-this-one-for-yearsEvery year for the past eight to ten years at the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes I've looked skyward above the West Virginia Capitol Complex. I always thought, I want to see the walk from above. Today, that idea became a reality. My friend and incredible photographer, Andrew Yianne, and I went flying high above the walk. It was beyond awesome to fly above an event my family has been a part of for so many years. Thank you, Andrew, for agreeing to go and take the photos! Ironically enough, Andrew tells me his mom was more worried about him driving around with some friends then she was him flying around with me. Below are some of the pictures. (All copyrighted to Andrew Yianne). Also, click here to see all of the photos on Andrew's blog.
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<![CDATA[Europe! Yep, I t features a #SelfieStick]]>Tue, 07 Apr 2015 01:17:32 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/europe-yep-i-t-features-a-selfiestickA picture is worth a thousand words, so I'll let my pictures do the talking! I will say... As a person that has always wanted to see more of the world and travel outside of the country, this was an excellent opportunity. I want to express my thanks to the wonderful teachers that went with our group as well as my fellow students. You ALL are awesome, I enjoyed getting to know you and experience new places and culture with you all. Thank you for reminding me not all high schoolers are jackasses. To our new friends from Louisiana, it was great meeting you all and exploring Europe with you guys! Also, thank you to my parents for letting me go. Finally, thank you to our incredible tour guide, David, of EF Tours. He  held this trip together and did a fantastic job organizing everything. I sure will miss following his umbrella with the flag of Great Britain on it around Europe. 
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<![CDATA[Signed, selaed, and delivered... with a handshake.]]>Fri, 20 Mar 2015 00:51:14 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/signed-selaed-and-delivered-with-a-handshakeIn my 17 years of life I've been able to shake hands with a lot of people... Olympians, Senators, Congressmen and Congresswomen, Governors, friends, family, and even Kevin Spacey. It wasn't until today that I realized a handshake would be the sign of achieving a lifelong dream. Let's rewind a bit.

March 17, 2015: Oh, that's TOMORROW?

"I can't sleep. I'm worried I'll fail. I'm stressing out." My mind was racing as I lay in bed thinking about what was going to happen the next morning. School exams? No, my practical exam (or checkride) to become an FAA Licensed Private Pilot. I was beyond nervous; however, I knew I was ready. I may have stayed up until 11 o'clock at night to finish planning my simulated cross country flight, but hey, I was ready. 

March 18, 2015: The Checkride

I woke up early, I was nervous. I got to the airport about an hour before my checkride. I set all of my stuff up in a conference at Executive Air and waited. Enter my designated examiner, Retired Air National Guard Colonel William "Bill" Peters. "He isn't looking for a 1,000 hour pilot, he wants a safe pilot." my instructor Brenda reassured me. Okay, fair enough I thought to myself. I was still nervous, Mr. Peters has flown everything from a 172 to a LearJet to a C130 to a 737. He told me to stay relaxed that the oral exam would basically be us having a conversation. "Okay, let's go fly", when Colonel Peters said this I knew I had moved on to the next stage of the checkride, the actual flying. The oral exam was a lot less painful than I ever expect. I'm so glad my friend and fellow pilot, Ryan, helped me study so much. Along with my instructor and her husband, Ernie, I had a lot of great people help me out with prepping for the exam. 

I went through my preflight checks without deviating from the checklist, Colonel Peters was watching my every move. On a side note, I never deviate from checklists, even if I have them memorized. Checklists NEVER forgot and could very easily be the difference between life and death. Complacency kills more people in aviation then you would imagine, doing things by the book is truly the only way to fly. We got in; I started up the airplane and got the ATIS report. We then took off on our simulated cross country. Everything went great. Next objective, maneuvers. They all went well until I busted on steep turns. "Well, we can go back and land or keep going." I said, let's keep going! We finished maneuvers and went back to the airport and finished up with various types of takeoffs and landings. I passed everything else.

That evening I practiced steep turns with Brenda and was confident I had them down. 

March 19, 2o15: I'm a pilot

The next morning I met Brenda at the airport to practice steep turns one more time. We had to go back and land so I could finish up my checkride with Colonel Peters. We talked for a little bit and then headed out to the sanctioned practice area. Colonel Peters looked at me and said, "Whenever you're ready." I took a deep breath and did a steep turn. "You're done, take us back." I smiled because I knew I passed although I still had this thought that maybe I didn't. Once I landed, taxied to parking and shut the airplane down, Colonel Peters reached over and shook my hand, "Congratulations, Jay." It was at this exact moment I knew it had all paid off, I was stepping out of N6238D as an FAA Licensed Private Pilot. Just like that, a dream was signed, sealed, and delivered with a handshake. When we printed off my temporary certificate I couldn't stop starring at it. I tweeted, facebooked, and instagramed pictures of it, I was so happy I didn't know what to do. I had achieved a dream and that meant the world to me. At 17 I could say I had a pilots license before a drivers license. I could finally take my friends and family flying by myself. I could finally call myself a pilot. Above all of that, I got to prove anything can be done as a Type One Diabetic, and that to me surpasses anything I can do in my life.

Before I got my license I knew I would have a lot of people to thank for their help and support... Ironically I didn't foresee myself thanking the examiner; however, I can't not thank mine. Colonel Peters, thank for making my checkride a fun experience filled with learning. It was an absolute pleasure to be able to fly with one of the best. I also want to extend my thanks to my parents for always supporting me. I want to thank whatever store my mom bought wine from to stay relaxed when I would venture off on solo cross country flights. Also, Brenda, my instructor, and her husband, Ernie.... You guys are the best. A huge thank you to everyone that helped me study and prepare for this day. Also, a huge thank you to all of my friends out there in the aviation community for all of your support. I'm proud to be in such an amazing industry with such incredible people. 

What's next?

I look forward to flying with all of my family and friends. Sharing aviation is what it's all about. I plan on getting my Instrument Rating and eventually CFII. If the regulations change I would love to fly corporate and eventually for an airline. 

Until next time!

Blue Skies and Tail Winds,

Jay Haapala
FAA Licensed Private Pilot
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Colonel William Peters and I
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My instructor, Brenda, and I
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My dad and I, unfortunately my mom couldn't be there because of work. She was ironically taking care of another kid with diabetes.
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<![CDATA[January-Feburary updates]]>Fri, 27 Feb 2015 02:14:14 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/january-feburary-updatesI'll keep this one short... 

It is winter, it is cold. Very cold. All of Charleston has this gloomy look to it. I wanted to fly; however, the cold air didn't want me to. I logged a few hours in January and February prepping for my upcoming checkride in March. I even deiced a Cessna 172 with a spray bottle, it wasn't bad until a King Air decided to advance to full power on the ramp in front of me. Cold ears suck! Here's to better weather! 

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<![CDATA[2014: A Year in Review]]>Thu, 01 Jan 2015 05:13:29 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/2014-a-year-in-reviewAs I sit here reflecting on the year my mind is overtaken with thoughts of what an incredible year 2014 has been. In 365 days I have traveled a lot, met some incredible people, and accomplished a lifelong dream. I don't want to go into detail in text as that would be boring. I want to the tell the story of my 2014 in pictures. 2014 taught me a lot about not only myself a lot about life. A lot can be accomplished in 365 days, ideas can be created, people can be met, places can be seen, eyes can be opened, and dreams can become reality. I hope 2014 was a great year for you all and that you find you have an even better 2015. Here's my 2014  in review...
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<![CDATA[T:Slim]]>Sat, 29 Nov 2014 02:55:48 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/tslim
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t:slim image © Tandem Diabetes
PictureCozmo Pumps
I woke up and felt like a kid on Christmas morning. I got out of bed and started pacing around the house. After some time I found myself sitting on my couch; waiting. I pulled my iPhone out of my pocket and opened the web browser and hit refresh. 

"South Charleston, WV, United States, 11/27/2014 6:34 A.M. Out For Delivery"


It was an extremely welcomed thing to see. After months of wanting one I was finally able to get a t:slim Insulin Pump from Tandem Diabetes Care! I literally ran outside (it was 20 degrees) in shorts to meet the UPS man. So why was I so excited? I knew the t:slim would be an incredible piece of medical technology before I even used one. In the Spring of 2014 I met with a t:slim representative about having a table at the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes; when I held the demo t:slim I knew one day I would be wearing one. As someone who is always drawn to the latest in greatest in technology I was utterly impressed with the t:slim. It's small, sleek design with its beautiful touchscreen got my attention immediately. Looks are great; however, it's what's inside that really counts. 

The t:slim is my fourth brand of insulin pump. My first (and by far my favorite pump) was manufactured by a company called Smith Medical. Enter the Deltec Cozmo. Unfortunately, Smith Medical manufactures medical equipment for several other reasons not pertinent to type one diabetes. Cozmo eventually went defunct due to lack of profit for Smith Medical. I was pretty sad and unfortunately had to switch pump companies. I really disliked the company I switched to. After spending upwards of 45 minutes on hold with customer service for a malfunctioning insulin pump you lose a lot of respect for that company. After years without my beloved Cozmo pump I'm finally getting some of the key components that made Cozmo so successful and popular among pump users back. When I found out that t:slim incorporated Cozmo technology I knew I had to have one. 

 As a pumper of 10 years, I can say with confidence that Tandem is the first company to actually listen to insulin pump users. A company that doesn't evolve dies. The pump company I used prior to t:slim didn't evolve. They more or less released the same insulin pump every time a "new" pump came out. Before I continue, I do want to extend my gratitude to my previous pump companies. Your products made my life with T1D easier, better, and allowed me to live with a lot less boundaries. Your products helped keep me alive and that can never be taken for granted. However, t:slim... you guys did it. You took a product and turned it into an experience, you took the Xbox and made the Xbox One, you took the 35mm camera and made it digital, you took the Razor and turned it into the iPhone, you took the opinions of insulin pump users and created something remarkable. 

t:slim's slogan?... touch simplicity. Two words, yet those two words so elegantly define and describe the t:slim. When you hold the t:slim you instantly notice how small, light, sleek, and solid feeling it is. However, when you press the logo button on top to "wake" the pump, touch simplicity all makes sense. A bright, organized screen shows up. Much like a passcode on your phone the t:slim has a passcode (of 123) to prevent accidental insulin delivery. It's at that point that it hits you and you realize the pump is touchscreen! Every aspect of the pump is extremely easy to use. You're touching simplicity. Not only are you touching simplicity, you're operating simplicity with touch. The way the pump coincides with itself and operates really brings meaning to the phrase, touch simplicity. 

As I continue working to become a private pilot I think a lot about keeping my blood sugar within a safe range that not only satisfy the FAA, but myself as well. I can't wait to go flying with my t:slim! Soon, I will have a Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) and will mount it in the cockpit when I fly. Thanks to the ease of use of the t:slim, inflight insulin delivery will be a lot easier. Remember the days of pumps with an UP and DOWN arrow? Those days are over, t:slim utilizes its beautiful touchscreen to have an onscreen number pad. Instead of holding a button up to 80 carbs, you type in "80". This is the same with blood glucose input, talk about touch simplicity. 

I will say, overall I am extremely impressed with the t:slim. It was like unboxing an Apple product. (Yes, I sincerely believing the packaging of a product is crucial for its success.) How would I simply describe the awesomeness of the t:slim to a perspective teenaged user? Trade your smartphone in for a flip phone. The flip phone calls, maybe it texts. The t:slim is the smart phone, every other company is the flip phone. In short, its badass.

Until a cure for T1D is found, diabetes care is about eliminating variables. If we can make T1D easier to manage we can prevent complications. As t:slim evolves I can see them eliminating variables. While t:slim hasn't eliminate the variable of an insulin pump, they sure have redefined the variable. 

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t:slim image © Tandem Diabetes
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t:slim image © Tandem Diabetes
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t:slim image © Tandem Diabetes
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t:slim image © Tandem Diabetes
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<![CDATA[11 Years of Type One Diabetes]]>Thu, 09 Oct 2014 00:44:36 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/11-years-of-type-one-diabetesAs I sit here writing this a lot of things are going through my mind. Today marks 11 years since I was diagnosed with Type One Diabetes. Although measurable in the context of time these 11 years are much more then duration of time.  These 11 years have been experiences, lessons, and meeting new people, seeing new places, and achieving person goals. All told, these 11 years have been my life.

I could sit here and tell you that in those 11 years, 4,015 days have passed, I’ve pricked my fingers approximately 25,000 times, I’ve taken god knows how many units of insulin, and so on. However, why? That would be analyzing data; this isn’t a statistics class. Diabetes sucks, I’m not going to lie. I could tell you about what life with diabetes is like, I could sit here and complain about it, I could sit here and be in denial and not take care of myself, I could sit here and list facts about diabetes.  I’m not going to though. That would be pointless.

I want to talk about three of the most important things I have learned that you will never learn in school. The first thing: age is just a number that can’t stop you from doing anything (assuming it is legal for your age). As I write this looking back on the things I’ve experienced in my life so far it amazes me. At 17 I’ve met CEOs of airlines, flown a plane by myself, achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, have been recognized nationally for volunteer work, met famous people, traveled the United States, worked at an airport for two+ years, met with elected officials, toured countless aviation facilities across the country, flown over the Hollywood Sign, met countless incredible people, and so many other things. I hate hearing people my age say they can’t do things because they’re too young. Your age only limits you as much as you let it.

Walt Disney once said, “it’s kind of fun to do the impossible.” While flying planes with Type One Diabetes is far from impossible it has its challenges. It took me three months to get my medical certificate back from the FAA. Doctors and pilots have told me that they are sorry but that flying with Type One just couldn’t happen. Every time I strap into a plane and start its engine I’m reminded I’m doing what I was told I could never do. That’s the second thing… never take no for an answer. I always say I owe my thanks to those who encourage me with flying as well as those that tell me it would never happen. You have to turn others negative crap into inspiration to do what you love and know you can do. Sometimes doing what others said you couldn’t do is the best feeling ever.

I always skip school on the day I was diagnosed and do something cool. Today, I had the privilege to take my mom and grandma up for their first general aviation flights. My instructor, Brenda, was there because she legally had to be… but I did all the flying. Twelve knot cross winds and they both still loved it. My landings were some of my best. In all the years I can recall I don’t ever remember seeing them both so amazed with me. I really felt great. 

As I move forward with my quest to becoming a private pilot I have my ups and downs (no pun intended). This summer I had the opportunity to fly with a gentleman in Palomar, California and something he told me has stuck with me to this very day. “Oh, I love flying.” He said, “My training was a blast and it made me feel on top of the world… Until I thought about the money, then I got depressed.” Flying is ups for me until I think about the money. But hey, most dreams have a monetary price to pay. I’m at the point in my training where it’s really starting to become real, I’m closer then I have ever been to becoming a private pilot. This year I will finish up my training, take and pass (fingers crossed) my written test and practical flight test. It will be really cool to finally be able to fly my family friends up front with me.

I figured I’d go ahead and throw this out there… I’m going to Europe in the spring! London, Paris, and Barcelona for 10 days total. I’m going with a school tour and I am absolutely ecstatic to experience my first time outside of the United States. I found this out last night. I was already excited for my flight today and couldn’t help but be even more excited after finding out I was for sure going to Europe.

Before I move on to the third thing I’ve learned about life I want to stop for a second and say thank you to everyone that has gotten me to where I am today. I obviously want to thank my mom, dad, and all of my family and friends. A huge thank you to my friends at school that always support me and are always asking about my flying. I want to thank everyone I’ve met in aviation; the people who always look skyward like I do when they hear a plane. Some of the best people I have ever met, I’ve met through aviation. Also, thank you to Brenda and Ernie. Brenda has taught me how to fly and made me the pilot I am today. Ernie is her husband that always offers valuable insight to flying. He has so many great flying stories and I thoroughly enjoy every conversation I have with him.  I also want to say thanks to the T1D community, the response I’ve received to my flying is absolutely humbling and I’m honored to show that diabetes doesn’t have us, we have it.

The third thing I’ve learned about life is a quote from Muhammad Ali: “Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they've been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It's an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It's a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.” The more I think about this quote the more I relate it to my life and what it really means. A cure for type one diabetes will happen someday. Flying was supposed to be impossible. Now, over a hundred years later, we’ve made the world a smaller place. I was never supposed to act as pilot in command of an aircraft; I’ve now done that multiple times. We can’t measure things with the notion of how difficult they are to accomplish. If there’s a will, there’s a way.

I may be a 17 year old high school student but I like the direction my life is going. I’m confident next year as I celebrate 12 years of life with T1D I’ll be able to start by saying I’m a private pilot. One day I will be in the left seat of a commercial airliner burning jet fuel for a living. Until then I’ll continue living with diabetes. I’ll continue to fly. I’ll continue to experience awesome things. I’ll continue to see the impossible becoming the accomplished. Always remember… Impossible is nothing. Always have the courage and persistence to follow your dreams. Oh yeah, always look up. Looking down is pointless. The sky is filled with planes flying around the globe providing an incredible visual representation of how impossible is nothing. I may have diabetes but it sure doesn’t have me!

Until next time,

Blue Skies!

Jay

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On the ground with my mom after fly her around
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I got to check out a replica Japanese Zero warbird today
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On the ground with my grandma after flying her around
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Finishing up my final checks before taking my mom flying
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I want to thank this guy for hanging out and watching me fly at Yeager since day one. The FBO house cat is always around. This guy always helps me stay calm before I head out on a flight by myself.
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<![CDATA[my second solo flight]]>Sun, 17 Aug 2014 23:58:33 GMThttp://flyingoninsulin.weebly.com/blog/my-second-solo-flightMy second solo flight started at the end of Taxiway Alpha holding short of Runway 23 at Yeager Airport.  I completed all of my preflight checks and requested permission for take off. "Skyhawk Three-Eight Delta, wind calm, make left close traffic, Runway two-three, cleared for takeoff." It was the voice of the air traffic controller advising me I was cleared for takeoff.   I responded, "Cleared to go 23, wind calm, and I'll keep it in the left, Three-Eight Delta." I lined the Cessna 172 up on Runway 23, applied full power, and went flying.  I made one loop around the pattern and ended the flight... I already went up with Brenda that day and didn't want to spend a small fortune flying in one day.  As far as anything else to say... I could spend hours talking about what it's like to fly a plane by yourself.  I'll leave it at... Wow.
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